Science Corner Vol. 5 – Anxiety
with No Comments

Anxiety disorders are supposedly the 
most common mental health issue 
today for adolescents, with one
 national study of more than 10,000 
adolescents finding that about 31%
 qualified for an anxiety disorder at 
least at one point in their lives 
(Merikangas et al., 2010). 
Prescriptions given to children for 
these anxiety disorders are
antidepressants that include selective
 serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) most … Read More

Science Corner Vol. 4 – Brain Imaging: What It Can and Can’t Tell Us
with No Comments

The National Association for Child Development is always looking for the best knowledge to further our understanding of developmental disorders and their remediation. Therefore, we are fascinated by the prospects of neuroscience research, but are fully aware of the current limitations. One major area of neuroscience research that has generated a lot of hyped buzz over the last couple decades … Read More

Short-Term Memory, Working Memory, Long-Term Memory and Norfolk Pines
with No Comments

by Bob Doman I just returned from an outstanding trip to Sydney, Australia. I worked with some great folks and evaluated many kids whose potential I can’t wait to help unlock. I also met with some great open-minded folks at the University of Sydney to discuss a research project with our Simply Smarter System and creating NACD courses for their … Read More

Beyond “Therapy”: Thoughts on factors influencing gross and fine motor development, with ramifications affecting cognitive function and language in developmentally challenged children.
with No Comments

by Bob Doman I have observed a number of problems in our children whose overall development is slower than that of typically developing children, issues that are only indirectly associated with the actual neurological and physical aspects of their function. The degree to which the brain seeks change is related to the rate of development.           For most children with developmental … Read More

Brain Change: Simple Interventions to Dramatically Improve Student Functioning
with No Comments

by Carol Estrada Bruce Haslam, PhD, Director of Research for The NACD Foundation, along with Tamara Knapp-Grosz, PhD, Director of Counseling and Support Services at Savannah College of Art & Design, presented “Brain Change: Simple Interventions to Dramatically Improve Student Functioning” at the 45th Southeast Conference of College Counseling Center Personnel held on November 5-7th in Chattanooga, TN. The presentation … Read More

More on Brain Oxygen and Lung Health: Vital Capacity
with No Comments

by Steve Riggs, BS, RRT-NPS Vital capacity may not sound like a very exciting subject. However it is a very important subject and one that we address frequently at NACD. So it’s worth your time to learn a little about what it is and why it is significant. There is a lot of talk about vital capacity (VC) when we … Read More

My Brain Needs Oxygen—What Can I Do?
with No Comments

by Steve Riggs, BS, RRT-NPS How can I get more oxygen into my brain? We all know that our bodies need some attention in order to grow and be healthy. We know that we need a good diet and exercise. But what about our brain? What does it need to be able to grow, to heal, and to learn in … Read More

Bilingualism: The Way to Go
with No Comments

by Prachi Sinha, NACD Developmentalist in India I live in a country where diversity is the best description. This applies to languages as well as culture. We have 29 different languages in India. Our common everyday use language is called Hindustani, which is a mixture of Hindi, Urdu, English, and some Sanskrit as well. Almost all households in India—rich or … Read More

Happy Holidays (And Do I Have a Gift for You…..and Me!)
with No Comments

by Bob Doman At the moment I’m on a flight from Salt Lake City to Orlando. It’s December 12th, and I seem to have lost a week someplace.  I’ll be in Orlando for the week, and then it’s Christmas week.  I thought I had another week in there to get my shopping done, put up some decorations, and stock up … Read More

Minimal Brain Dysfunction: “Philip”
with No Comments

Philip could not speak to be understood until he was four years old. At that point there were only a few words that someone besides myself and his Daddy could understand. We were very concerned. He couldn’t stand noise and began making dull repetitive noises when confusion surrounded him. Lots of pieces to Philip’s puzzle were not on the table. … Read More