NACD Journal
NACD Journal

Selected NACD Foundation Journal Articles

In an effort to elevate the understanding of families participating in our program as well as those who are new to our concept, we provide articles from the Journal of The NACD Foundation (formerly The National Academy for Child Development), a periodical published by The NACD Foundation. We encourage you to take a look at the abstracts that follow and browse the articles at your convenience.

Articles are published relative to all aspects of human development. Correspondence and manuscripts related to parenting, education, and/or human development may be submitted to the following address:

NACD
549 25th Street
Ogden, Utah 84401

 

List of Articles

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Abstracts and Links to Full Articles

The Selective Use of TV and Videos for Advancing the Development of Special Needs, Typical and Accelerated Preschool Children.
Robert J. Doman Jr.

"TV is, in fact, such a great tool for the development of central vision that if it did not already exist as an instrument for entertainment we would have had to create it as a therapeutic tool."

 

The Autism Spectrum
Robert J. Doman Jr.

Abstract

We've come a long way since the 1960s when autism was assumed to be a psychiatric illness caused by the mothers. Since that time, five major breakthroughs have lead Robert J. Doman, Jr., and the NACD to the forefront of successful treatment of children diagnosed within the autism spectrum. Confident that future discoveries will go even further in solving the puzzle of autism, Doman believes "the answers are hidden within the children." In this article, Doman chronicles in detail the five breakthroughs made thus far, and goes further to explain NACD's current stand on the physiological issues that often accompany autism. Finally, Doman outlines the NACD protocol for addressing each aspect of the individual child's neurological status by applying techniques and methodologies appropriate for each area of concern. Doman stresses the imperative of eliminating "stimming," which he has more definitively renamed "debilitating sensory addiction." He urges parents and practitioners to recognize the physiological sensitivity of children along the spectrum and to proceed with caution in implementing physiological interventions. Each child is an individual who must be carefully evaluated and monitored as to their unique response. Above all, Doman urges parents and professionals alike to be open to change as new and better techniques and methods are discovered.

 

Learning How You Learn
Auditory and Visual Digit Spans – What Do They Mean?

Robert J. Doman, Jr.

Abstract

How well we learn is a direct reflection of how well our brains receive, process, store and utilize information. Many learning problems are related to the basic brain functions of processing what there is to see and hear. This article discusses how auditory and visual short-term memory relate to learning, and what problems can be caused by visual or auditory processing difficulties. Specific directions are given to enable a parent to evaluate their child's auditory and visual short-term memory by testing auditory and visual digit spans. Methods are given for improving auditory and visual function in infants, toddlers, children and adults. Many children and adults today struggle with unidentified processing difficulties (i.e., learning disabilities) that could be identified and eliminated with these very simple procedures.

 

Your ADD/ADHD Child and Homeschooling
John M. Jaquith, M.Ed.

Abstract

Because the majority of a child’s early learning experience takes place in the home, the child’s parents are not only the first but, in many cases, the best suited teachers of the child. The fact that the child may have attention deficient disorder (ADD) or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) does not detract from the parent’s favorable position in promoting the child’s advancement. This can be achieved through testing and observation by the parents, and working with the child in exercises that will further the child’s typical development.

 

Your ADD/ADHD Child
John M. Jaquith, M.Ed.

Abstract

There are a number of symptoms that indicate the presence of ADD and ADHD. These symptoms are not the problem, but are indicative of developmental deficiencies such as attention problems, tactility issues, auditory and visual processing concerns, long-term memory problems, impulsive behavior, and certain negative behaviors. By recognizing the symptoms that point to these problems, parents can implement positive environmental settings that will encourage the typical growth and development of their child.

Autistic Child
Robert J. Doman, Jr.

Abstract

Autistic children have traditionally been viewed as having severe emotional problems, often attributed to maternal rejection. The view that autistic children are emotionally disturbed is based more on supposition than fact. NACD’s view is that autistic children are not emotionally disturbed, but have sensory dysfunctions that parallel children who are brain-injured. By viewing autism from this point of view, a new perspective can be obtained on how treat such children. The treatment includes components of neurological organization, specific sensory training, design of a protected sensory environment, behavior management, and general medial and nutritional care. With such treatment programs, the hyper-sensory functions found in most autistic children can often be changed from a negative function to a positive.

Child Management
Robert J. Doman, Jr.

Abstract

Positive behavior in a child is possible if a positive environment is maintained. A positive environment is one in which the frequency and intensity of negative interactions are substantially outweighed by positive interactions. However, a positive environment is also one in which parents maintain realistic expectations; and a structure of enforcement, reinforcement, and consequences.

Coma: A State of Profound Unconsciousness
Robert J. Doman, M.D.

Abstract

Hospitals and medical practitioners have traditionally treated comatose patients with approaches that reflect little or no practical knowledge of brain physiology and dysfunction following serious brain injury. This has resulted in mixed efforts to stimulate the patient’s brain sufficient to regain consciousness. While hospital environments do provide stimuli in the everyday treatment and care of the patient, the stimuli has never been sufficient to arouse the patient from a coma. Doctor Doman’s approach involves subjecting the comatose patient to a program of intensive sensory stimulation. It has been shown to be a positive approach in treating certain types of coma.

Dominance and Emotionality
Robert J. Doman, Jr.

Abstract

The aspect of the brain that provides for the separation of neurological functions, and emotional control over an individual’s behavior is referred to as cortical hemispheric dominance. In typical individuals, emotionality is a sub-dominant function. In neurologically dysorganized individuals, emotionality cannot be separated from other neurological functions that contribute to balanced behavior. By understanding these functional relationships, neurological inefficiencies can be treated.

Down Syndrome Perspectives: A Message to the Parents of Down Syndrome Children
Robert J. Doman, Jr.

Abstract

Down Syndrome children have traditionally been viewed as children who are incapable of development. Accordingly, the educational and therapeutic opportunities afforded these children were either limited or non-existent. While much progress has been made to reverse this trend, there is still a long way to go. Many DS children have the potential to achieve "typical" academic function. However, this potential cannot be fully achieved in typical special education and special need programs. NACD’s approach is to provide parents with the education and tools to work with their own children. The approach is a home based, parent involvement system based on the principle that educational and therapeutic intervention can only be achieved through a thorough understanding of neurological function and development.

Establishing a Positive Environment Through Data Collection
Robert J. Doman, Jr.

Abstract

The importance and implications of a positive environment cannot be underestimated. A child’s entire attitude, self-image, and relationship with family and peers are at stake. A positive environment is recognized as one in which there are four positive responses to every negative response. Rewards and punishment are dispensed in a manner and frequency that promotes positive behavior in the child. However, It is virtually impossible to establish a positive environment in the home without the collection and use of data to measure responses. Once the responses are accurately measured, parents can take corrective action.

Food Sensitivities: The Hidden Problems
Robert J. Doman, M.D.

Abstract

There are a number of behavioral and medical problems that may indicate food sensitivities in a child. The symptoms can include nose and throat congestion, headaches, and post nasal drip. Many foods and food product additives can result in food sensitivities. NACD recommends that parents consider an elimination type diet when this condition is suspected.

Home & The School: Conflict or Complement?
Robert J. Doman, Jr.

Abstract

There are a number of factors that can influence the creation of a positive home and school relationship. While some factors may be difficult to control, there are others that can be controlled if the parent takes appropriate action. A positive classroom environment, appropriate management of the child’s extracurricular activities, involvement in the child’s school and homework activities, and maintaining close communication with the teacher are all factors that parents can control. However, the most important is creating and maintaining a positive environment for the child’s educational and developmental progress.

Importance of Visual Pursuits and Convergence
Robert J. Doman, M.D.

Abstract

Visual development and reading comprehension problems in children can be caused by poor visual pursuits or the lack of coordination of eye movement while reading, and poor convergence, which is the inability of the eyes to focus on an object. While children normally develop convergence skills during the creeping stage, both poor visual pursuit and lingering convergence problems can be treated by NACD through a number of specific exercises.

In My Travels
Robert J. Doman, Jr.

Abstract

A traditional view of medical professionals is that, in the absence of published research or established procedures on the treatment of certain impairments, little can be further done to treat those impairments. Contrary to this view, NACD’s approach is to continue beyond these parameters to accumulate, expand, and create the knowledge’s necessary to treat those impairments.

Language Acquisition in Children With Down Syndrome
Robert J. Doman, Jr.

Abstract

NACD’s neurodevelopment approach to the treatment of children with Downs Syndrome is to view speech and language impairments as stemming from the limited development of auditory tonal processing, and auditory sequential processing. The latter determines the ability to process language, think conceptually, and achieve adequate self-expression. The need for self-expression or to communicate can be restricted because of health issues, and can lead to alternative means of communication such as sign language. Contrary to many medical practitioners and caregivers who allow sign language, NACD stresses that signing adversely affects typical development.

Learning Disabilities and Organization
Robert J. Doman, Jr.

Abstract

Neurological dysorganization can be detected by comparing a child’s mobility movements with those that are expected at various levels of the brain. These levels include the pons, mid-brain, lower cortex, and top cortical level. At each respective level, a child should be able crawl, creep, and walk in a general “cross pattern” movement. The top cortical level is where hemispheric dominance is established. A completely organized child should have a dominant hand, foot, ear, and eye all on the same side.

The Learning "Disabled" Child: Special Education
Robert J. Doman, Jr.

Abstract

With the recent advent of special education programs, many children are being classified and placed in segregated learning environments that are not only abnormal but also counter-productive to developing their full potential. As a result of their placement in these categories, these children are being stigmatized with labels that destine them to continued segregation and underachievement. Conditions such as neurological disorganization, and behavioral problems can often be remediated through home programs and typical learning environments without the stigma of special education labels.

Learning Environment
Robert J. Doman, Jr.

Abstract

The single most important factor in determining how much and how well children learn is their learning environment. A positive environment encourages learning, while a negative environment can create neurological dysfunction and discourage learning. Symptoms of a negative environment include defiance, lack of motivation, anger, poor self-image, and lack of development and learning. A positive environment promotes a positive attitude, self-image, rate of learning, and extent to which a child learns.

Learning Problems and Attention Deficits
Robert J. Doman, Jr.

Abstract

Children who are identified as having attending and learning problems are typically labeled with one or more of a range of disorders that often leave parents confused and mystified by the labels. Contrary to this approach, NACD has found that learning and attention problems can often be understood, treated, and eliminated without the stigma of administratively designated labels.

Neurological Dysorganization and Antisocial Behavior
Robert J. Doman, M.D.

Abstract

NACD views neurologically disorganized children as those having a brain that is inefficient in its ability to receive, process, store, and utilize information. The symptoms associated with these problems are too often given labels that call for treatment of the symptoms rather than the cause. NACD’s approach is to treat the brain rather than the symptoms with a program appropriate for the individual child.

Special Needs Children: Parents are the Experts!
Robert J. Doman, Jr.

Abstract

There is wide consensus that the best learning environment is one in which a child is in the least restrictive environment, has ample 1:1 time, has outstanding role models, and has access to programs that meet his or her individual needs. NACD’s view is that only the home and child’s parents can provide the elements that fully address the child’s special needs.

Philosophy and Rationale
Robert J. Doman, Jr.

Abstract

NACD’s programs are based on the concepts of plasticity and redundancy of the Central Nervous System, and the branching effect of the system through specific stimulations. Because of this, it is possible to design treatments and/or acceleration programs that provide specific stimulation to those levels that require further organization. The goal of these programs is to lessen the dysfunction so that his highest functional potential of a child may be realized.

Seizures
Robert J. Doman, M.D.

Abstract

Dr. Robert Doman lists the many possible causes of seizures. He explains that there are different types of seizures, with fifteen of the more common types being named and defined for the reader.

Sensory Deprivation
Robert J. Doman, M.D.

Abstract

Regular and proper stimulation of the brain through the five senses is imperative to its typical functioning. History has shown that deprivation of this stimulation can result in major deterioration in the brain’s efficiency including lower IQ, partial loss of memory, and personality changes. Evaluating brain efficiency using NACDs “Developmental Profile” can increase awareness of these shortcomings, and can provide individualized programs of sensory stimulation to reduce or prevent their occurrence.

Sensory Stimulation
Robert J. Doman, Jr.

Abstract

The “Right to Education” law enacted by the Pennsylvania legislature during the seventies provided the promise that all children would receive an “appropriate education”. While this appeared to be a milestone towards insuring adequate funding for children with severe brain dysfunctions, it soon became apparent that government controls and restrictions made appropriate education little more than custodial care. NACD’s approach is to provide a full multi-sensory environment that stimulates the brain and permits increased functional development. This development can best be achieved only through the active participation of the parents.

Trauma
Robert J. Doman, M.D.

Abstract

Head injuries caused by vehicle accidents, industrial accidents, assaults, sports injuries, and falls are the leading cause of death of persons between the age of one and forty-four. They include mild head injures, concussions, and severe skull fractures. Head injures, particularly severe skull fractures, can be complicated by blood clots which require immediate attention if the patient is to survive. After such injuries, patients should be immediately hospitalized and tested for increased pressure within the skull.

Trauma and Recovery
Robert Silverman

Abstract

There is a tendency for many doctors to believe that little or nothing can be done for severe brain injuries, and that rest homes are often the only recourse. NACD’s approach has shown that much can be done, but it comes with a price. Patients must choose between spending their lives in confusion and despair, or entering a program that involves hard work over a period of years, often with only a possibility of hope. NACD’s neurological program to deal with these injuries is a long, involved, and complicated process.

 

"Cerebral Palsy"
Robert J. Doman, Jr.

Abstract

The diagnosis of cerebral palsy refers to a broad range of physical symptoms that develop as a result of injury to the motor centers of the brain. This article examines in detail the varied symptoms associated with cerebral palsy and defines medical terms commonly applied to aspects of the disorder. By addressing the real cause of cerebral palsy symptoms - the neurological dysorganization resulting from the brain injury - an effective treatment protocol can be designed. Given the opportunity for specific stimulation to improve the neurological organization in the brain, virtually all children diagnosed with cerebral palsy can improve, and some can achieve "typical" function.

"Dad Keeps Pledge - Girl Walks"
The St. Louis Post Dispatch

Abstract

This newspaper article documents the moving story of one family's triumph over cerebral palsy. Paralyzed since nine months old, little Stephanie Bridgeman is still in leg braces and unable to walk more than a few steps at five years old, despite three years of standard physical therapy. Unwilling to accept her lack of progress, Stephanie's father promises help to his young daughter. The family begins an intensive treatment regimen at home under the guidance of the National Association of Child Development. One year later, Stephanie is able to walk without her braces or her walker - and thanks her father for keeping his promise.

"Parents Are The Solution!"
Linda W. Bates

Abstract

Parental commitment combined with NACD expertise develops parents into capable teachers who know exactly what they are trying to accomplish with their child. Under NACD guidance, parents understand what to teach, when to teach, and how often to teach it. Attitudes developed along the way include greater feelings of competence for the parent and enhanced self worth for the child. Parents discover that not only is the NACD approach a formula for success in advancing their child's development, but it also strengthens the parent-child bond like few things can.

"A Very Special Gift"
Susan Garrett

Abstract

Born with the rare disorder known as Williams Syndrome, Tricia Garrett remained undiagnosed for her first year of life. Upon diagnosis, doctors offered no encouragement of any kind. Despite the textbook prognosis of "mental retardation," Tricia's parents knew she was bright and able to learn if given adequate opportunity. Their prayers were answered when they discovered first the Institute for the Achievement of Human Potential and later the National Association for Child Development. Parent Susan Garrett describes Tricia's progress and how NACD is helping them help Tricia reach her maximum potential.

"Never Give Up"
Lyn Waldeck

Abstract

Long-time NACD parent Lyn Waldeck recounts her family's journey from devastation to a "Disneyland" of thrilling progress. After receiving the doctor's prognosis that their adopted son would "never walk, never talk, never see, and will be unable to do the tasks that will give him a meaningful life," the Waldeck's proceeded through the early intervention route until they realized that the professional expectations for their son were unacceptably low. They sought additional help and found it through Robert J. Doman, Jr., and NACD. From the front lines of overcoming severe brain damage in their child, Mrs. Waldeck offers a rallying cry for all parents who refuse to accept the status quo for their hurt child. "If you are new and a bit skeptical, that's okay. Just do the program and you will see for yourself." While it is typical to question whether it is worth it at times when progress seems slow, do not let such questions become a self-fulfilling prophecy, she reminds us. "Persevere, and you will overcome."

"Your Father Said" - Process Fathering
Robert J. Doman, Jr.

Abstract

In this article Bob Doman discusses the enormous impact fathers have on their children and the tragic consequences of missing out on playing a positive role in influencing their development. Doman offers very specific means by which fathers (and mothers) can understand fathering as a process and implement changes that can make all the difference in a child's progress as well as the overall success and happiness of the whole family.

The Causes of Seizures
Robert J. Doman, M.D.

Abstract

Dr. Robert Doman lists the many possible causes of seizures. He explains that there are different types of seizures, with fifteen of the more common types being named and defined for the reader.

The NACD Neurodevelopmental Approach to Human Development
Robert J. Doman Jr.

Abstract

An overview of the neurodevelopmental approach implemented by NACD.

Simply Smarter TDI - Targeted Developmental Intervention TSI - Targeted Sound Intervention Fast ForWord TLP - The Listening Program emwave Play Attention

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